medievalpoc:

leeandlow submitted to medievalpoc:




The Diversity Gap in the highest grossing science fiction and fantasy films. Sad, right? You can see the full study here.

I highly recommend reading the entire article.
from the infographic:
Among the top 100 domestic grossing films:• only 8% of films star a protagonist of color• of the 8 protagonists of color, all are men; 6 are played by Will Smith and 1 is a cartoon character (Aladdin)• 0% of protagonists are women of color• 0% of protagonists are LGBTQ• 1% of protagonists are people with a disability

medievalpoc:

leeandlow submitted to medievalpoc:

The Diversity Gap in the highest grossing science fiction and fantasy films. Sad, right? You can see the full study here.

I highly recommend reading the entire article.

from the infographic:

Among the top 100 domestic grossing films:

• only 8% of films star a protagonist of color
• of the 8 protagonists of color, all are men; 6 are played by Will Smith and 1 is a cartoon character (Aladdin)
• 0% of protagonists are women of color
• 0% of protagonists are LGBTQ
• 1% of protagonists are people with a disability

(via eatingsoapboxes)

Leena being… Leena

(via dangercupcakemurdericing)

60 Black Women In Horror Writing

sumikosaulson:

60 Black Women In Horror Writing

Sumiko Saulson:

A really cool article / review of 60 Black Women in Horror Writing …

Originally posted on Illuminite Caliginosus:

This book, 60 Black Women In Horror, is something of an eye-opener.  Let’s face it: other than Octavia Butler and L.A. Banks, the number of black women known for writing anything other than Urban Romance and whatnot is mighty damn slim.   I’ll admit to the shortcoming…

View On WordPress

(via thisisntmyrealhair)

MAKE ME CHOOSE:
thefaultinoursparklez asked: Martha or Clara?

(via acceber74)

Because so much of fantasy takes place in settings that in no way resemble the real world, featuring species that in no way resemble human, fantasy writers often have trouble dealing with regular people. This is something that, I think, isn’t as much of a problem for mainstream writers, because they can simply describe the world around them and come up with a reasonably accurate representation of humanity. They can also fall back on the plethora of real-world terms used to describe human beings, racially and otherwise. But using these terms makes no sense if you’re dealing with a world that doesn’t share our political/cultural context. You can’t call someone “African American” if your world has no Africa, no America, and has never gone through a colonial phase in which people of disparate cultures were forcibly brought together, thus necessitating the term in the first place.

That said, it’s equally illogical to populate your fantasy world with only one flavor of human being, which is what far too many fantasy stories default to. Granted, many fantasies take place in confined cultural spaces — a single small kingdom in a Europeanish milieu, maybe a single city or castle within that city. (But how did that castle get its spices for the royal table, or that lady her silks? What enemy are the knights training to fight? Even in the most monochromatic parts of the real Ye Olde Englande, I can guarantee you there were some Asian traders, Sephardic or Ashkenazic Jewish merchants, Spanish diplomats or nobles partly descended from black Moors, and so on.) I get that lots of countries on Earth are racially homogeneous, so it makes perfect sense that some fantasy settings would be too. But whiteness is the default in our thinking for Earth-specific cultural/political reasons. So while it’s logical for fantasy realms to be homogeneous, it’s not logical for so many of them to be homogeneously white. Something besides logic is causing that.

So. It’s a good idea for all fantasy writers to learn how to describe characters of color. And I think it’s a good idea to learn how to describe those characters in subtle ways, since they can’t always rely on Earth terminology. Now, doing subtle description increases the chance that the reader might misidentify the character racially — and to a degree, I think there’s nothing you can do about that. You’re working against a lifetime of baggage in the reader’s mind. But you can still insert enough cues so that when combined, they’ll get the idea across.

N.K. Jemisin, blogging on Describing Characters of Color for Magic District.  (via audreymgonzalez)

(via acceber74)

theblacksmithsdaughter:

quigonjesus:

I’M SCREAMING

these are interesting actress choices. The petite, delicate, dark fairy and the robust, pale, giantess. It makes me hopeful that the vision for this film is inovative and interesting.

theblacksmithsdaughter:

quigonjesus:

I’M SCREAMING

these are interesting actress choices. The petite, delicate, dark fairy and the robust, pale, giantess. It makes me hopeful that the vision for this film is inovative and interesting.

(via dangercupcakemurdericing)